CALDAR Logo

Center for Advancing
Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research

2015 Summer Institute on Longitudinal research:
Promoting Identification, Intervention, and Management of Risks and Problems of Substance Use


July 29 - 31, 2015 • Marina del Rey, California

The Center for Advancing Longitudinal Drug Abuse Research (CALDAR; Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., PI and Center Director), funded by NIDA (P30 DA016383), will host its fifth Summer Institute. The target audience is advanced students, junior investigators, experienced researchers, and substance abuse treatment providers interested in expanding their knowledge base and/or skills. The event will feature presentations by renowned researchers, policymakers, and clinicians who will highlight current findings and discuss future directions. Participants can register for the one-day conference on July 29, statistical training on July 30 and/or 31, or the entire three-day event (July 29-31).



conference agenda

DAY ONE – July 29, 2015

General Conference

This one-day conference will feature topics addressing national-level, state-level, and longitudinal perspectives on substance abuse.

Betty Tai, Ph.D., Center For The Clinical Trials Network, National Institute On Drug Abuse
Screening of Drug Use in Primary Care: Implications for Developing a Collaborative Chronic Care Model

Presentation Slides

Constance Weisner, Dr.P.H., L.C.S.W., University Of California, San Francisco And Kaiser Permanente Division of Research
New Horizons in Integrating Substance Use and Health Systems Research: Using Electronic Health Records

Presentation Slides

Linda Chang, M.D., University of Hawai'i
Prenatal Stimulant Exposure on Brain Development

Lisa Marsch, Ph.D., Dartmouth College
Technology-based Interventions for Substance Use Disorders: The State of the Science

Presentation Slides

Edith V. Sullivan, Ph.D., Stanford University
Longitudinal Brain Imaging and the Effects of High Alcohol Exposure in Humans and Animal Models

Presentation Slides

Additional speakers may be added to this day. Please check the website periodically for details and updates.



DAY TWO – July 30, 2015

Statistical Workshop

Track 1: Longitudinal Data Analysis for Investigators I

Donald Hedeker, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Introduction to Longitudinal Statistics Using Mixed Models

Presentation Slides

Track 2: Mediation Analysis

David MacKinnon, Ph.D., Arizona State University
Morning Session: Introduction to Mediation Analysis

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Afternoon Session: Advanced Topics in Mediation Analysis

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Career Development Workshop

Beth Babecki, M.A., NIDA
Training and Career Development: Perspectives from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Presentation Slides

Christine Grella, Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles
Career Development Applications:  Perspectives from a Reviewer

Presentation Slides

Linda Chang, M.D., University of Hawaii
Big Data from Neuroimaging Studies

Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles
Addiction Health Services Data Sources

Presentation Slides



DAY three – July 31, 2015

Statistical Workshop

Track 1: Longitudinal Data Analysis for Investigators II

Donald Hedeker, Ph.D., University Of Chicago
Morning Session: Variance Modeling of Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) Data
Afternoon Session: Mixed Models for Longitudinal Categorical Outcomes

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Track 2: Mediation Analysis

David MacKinnon, Ph.D., Arizona State University
Morning Session: Introduction to Mediation Analysis
Afternoon Session: Advanced Topics in Mediation Analysis

(See "Day 2 Track 2" above for workshop slides)



Intended Audience

The target audience is advanced students, junior investigators, experienced researchers, substance abuse treatment providers, and policy makers who are interested in expanding their knowledge base on topics related to longitudinal research and evidence-based approaches.  Participants in the conference should have a general interest in substance use disorders and longitudinal research; participants in the advanced statistical research workshops should have working knowledge of regression analysis.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the Summer Institute participants should be able to:

  • Describe methods for identification, intervention, and management of the risks and problems of substance use
  • Elucidate the impact of evidence-based research on clinical and policy interventions
  • Identify issues in the design of longitudinal research studies
  • Analyze longitudinal data with a variety of statistical methods
  • Interpret results of longitudinal data analyses

Institute Highlights

  • Presentations by renowned investigators in the areas of health care systems, substance use disorders, longitudinal analysis, developmental life course of substance use, and evidence-based approaches
  • Practical, experience-based instruction on the design of longitudinal research and analytical models


Location

Marina del Rey Marriott
4100 Admiralty Way
Marina del Rey, CA 90292
(310) 301-3000
marriott.com/laxmb



Sponsors


NIDA Logo

 

 

UCLA ISAP logo
UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP)

PSATTC Logo

A complete listing of supporters will be made available at the Summer Institute.



CALDAR Director and Summer Institute Chair
Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D.

Summer Institute Organizers
Claudia Bueno
Liz Evans
Annemarie Kelleghan
Ross Pineda
Marya Schulte, Ph.D.
Jessica Sinks

UCLA Summer Institute Conference Faculty
Mary-Lynn Brecht, Ph.D.
Thomas Freese, Ph.D.
Christine Grella, Ph.D.
Yih-Ing Hser, Ph.D.
Walter Ling, M.D.
Debra A. Murphy, Ph.D.
Michael Prendergast, Ph.D.
Richard Rawson, Ph.D.

Guest Faculty
Linda Chang, M.D.
Donald Hedeker, Ph.D.
David MacKinnon, Ph.D.
Lisa Marsch, Ph.D.
Betty Tai, Ph.D.
Constance Weisner, Dr.P.H., L.C.S.W.

Faculty Disclosure
All who are involved in the provision of educational activities for the Summer Institute are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest related to the subject matter of the educational activity. Safeguards against commercial bias have been put in place. Disclosure of these relevant financial relationships will be published in course materials so those participants in the activity may formulate their own judgments regarding the presentation.

Disclaimer
The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators at conferences sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services, do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the Federal government.



For More Information

Contact:

Liz Evans

Phone:

310-267-5315

Web site:

www.caldar.org

Fax:

310-312-0538

E-mail

laevans@ucla.edu



Faculty Biographical Paragraphs

Click here to view faculty bios.

Top of Page

Alcoholism follows a dynamic course, involving development, maintenance, recovery, and relapse. In vivo brain imaging enables the tracking of this course and has revealed evidence for disruption of selective macrostructural and microstructural brain tissue in Alcohol Use Disorder with evidence for improvement with sustained sobriety. Features of brain dysmorphology have been modeled in rodents under controlled conditions exposed to high levels of alcohol with reversal of damage after a week free of alcohol. These studies demonstrate the strength of longitudinal study using noninvasive MR imaging. Support: AA010723, AA012388, AA013521-INIA, AA017168, AA021697-NCANDA

The workshop expands material covered in the Introduction workshop to cover several advanced mediation models including mediation in path analysis, longitudinal mediation models, and mediation in the context of moderation. General issues in the investigation of mediation including methods to adjust for confounders and additional approaches to identifying mediating variables are described.

The goal of the workshop is to describe statistical, methodological, and conceptual aspects of mediation analysis. The workshop covers definitions, history, and applications of the mediation model. The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the research questions the mediation model can answer. Examples from mediation analysis in many substantive areas are described including drug prevention and treatment research. In Part II, the conceptual model described in Part I is quantified in the estimation of mediation in single and multiple mediator models. Estimation of mediation effects including assumptions of the methods, different statistical tests, effect size, controlled and natural indirect effects, and construction of confidence limits for the mediated effect are covered.

Mixed models (aka multilevel or hierarchical linear models) are increasingly used for analysis of longitudinal data, and methods for continuous outcomes are commonly used and applied. However, many research studies have non-normal outcomes, for example, outcomes that are dichotomous, ordinal, or nominal. Although methods for such non-normal outcomes have been available for quite some time, they are perhaps not as routinely applied as models for continuous outcomes. This workshop will focus on analysis of longitudinal dichotomous, ordinal and nominal outcomes. The following models will be described: mixed logistic regression for dichotomous outcomes, mixed logistic regression for nominal outcomes, and mixed proportional odds and non-proportional odds models for ordinal outcomes. The latter models are useful because the proportional odds assumption of equal covariate effects across the cumulative logits of the model is often unreasonable. Computer application using SAS, STATA, and Supermix will be described and illustrated.

For longitudinal data, mixed models include random subject effects to indicate how subjects influence their responses over the repeated assessments. The error variance and the variance of the random effects are usually considered to be homogeneous. These variance terms characterize the within-subjects (error variance) and between-subjects (random-effects variance) variation in the data. In studies using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), up to thirty or forty observations are often obtained for each subject, and interest frequently centers around changes in the variances, both within- and between-subjects. Also, such EMA studies often include several waves of data collection. In this workshop, we focus on an adolescent smoking study using EMA at both one and several measurement waves, where interest is on characterizing changes in mood variation associated with smoking. We describe how covariates can influence the mood variances, and also describe an extension of the standard mixed model by adding a subject-level random effect to the within-subject variance specification. This permits subjects to have influence on the mean, or location, and variability, or (square of the) scale, of their mood responses. Additionally, we allow the location and scale random effects to be correlated. These mixed-effects location scale models have useful applications in many research areas where interest centers on the joint modeling of the mean and variance structure. Computer application using SAS NLMIXED and the freeware MIXREGLS program will be described and illustrated.

The workshop expands material covered in the Introduction workshop to cover several advanced mediation models including mediation in path analysis, longitudinal mediation models, and mediation in the context of moderation. General issues in the investigation of mediation including methods to adjust for confounders and additional approaches to identifying mediating variables are described.

The goal of the workshop is to describe statistical, methodological, and conceptual aspects of mediation analysis. The workshop covers definitions, history, and applications of the mediation model. The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the research questions the mediation model can answer. Examples from mediation analysis in many substantive areas are described including drug prevention and treatment research. In Part II, the conceptual model described in Part I is quantified in the estimation of mediation in single and multiple mediator models. Estimation of mediation effects including assumptions of the methods, different statistical tests, effect size, controlled and natural indirect effects, and construction of confidence limits for the mediated effect are covered.

Mixed models (aka multilevel or hierarchical linear models) are increasingly used for analysis of longitudinal data in many research areas. A basic characteristic of these models is the inclusion of random subject effects to account for the influence of subjects on their repeated observations. These random subject effects describe each person’s growth across time and explain the correlational structure of the longitudinal data. In addition, they indicate the degree of subject variation that exists in the population of subjects. An important advantage of mixed models is that they do not require subjects to be measured at all study timepoints, thus subjects with incomplete data across time are included in the analysis. This workshop will focus on describing mixed models for continuous outcomes in a very practical way. It will be shown that these models can be seen as extensions of ordinal multiple regression models. Following the multilevel or HLM approach, the within- and between-subjects components of the model will be described. Several analyses of a psychiatric longitudinal dataset will be illustrated in order to carefully describe the key features of mixed models for longitudinal data analysis. In terms of computer application, examples using SAS, STATA, SPSS, and Supermix will be presented and illustrated.

A growing line of research has highlighted the promising role that interactive technologies (e.g., web, mobile devices) may play in the assessment, prevention, treatment, and recovery management of substance use disorders. In this presentation, Dr. Marsch will provide an overview of the state of the science in the development, evaluation, and implementation of technology-based therapeutic interventions for substance use disorders. This research underscores the role that technology may play in improving treatment for substance use disorders in a manner that increases access to care, is cost-effective, ensures fidelity, and enables the rapid diffusion and widespread adoption of science-based interventions.

Dr. Chang will focus her presentation on brain imaging and behavior studies that demonstrate how brain developmental trajectories may be altered in infants and children with prenatal stimulant exposure (including prenatal exposure to methamphetamine and tobacco smoking). Participants will learn about the various brain imaging techniques (e.g., MRI, DTI, MRS) that have been used to measure structural and chemical alterations during the critical periods of brain development in children with prenatal stimulant exposure, and how these changes may be related to behavioral consequences. Possible environmental factors or genetic predispositions that may further impact the brain developmental changes in the setting of prenatal drug exposure will also be discussed.

Coming soon

SUD treatment is historically separated from the mainstream medical practices. Community based SUD treatment programs receive treatment seekers and provides short term and episodic care. Only recently, a “recovery” model has been advocated as a way to manage the chronic nature of the disease. Preventative measures are usually in the school and/or in the community which is non-existence in the medical settings and missed the opportunity for managing multiple chronic conditions.

SUD prevalence is quite high among the US population. Majority of these people are neither aware of their risk behaviors nor diagnosed with the disorders. Therefore, the SUD conditions are grossly under-detected, not prevented and under treated in the US. 

For these reasons, the first element of SBIRT, the S- screening of SUD in general medical settings is an invaluable and critical procedure for integrating SUD care into general medical settings and for initiating a chronic care model for SUD care including prevention, early intervention and long term management of the conditions. With the aging of the US population, it is especially important to provide integrated, patients centered medical management of multiple co-morbid conditions that include SUDs.

A validated screening tool that is being used by many studies is the single question screener developed by Smith, et.al ., which yields either a “yes” or “no” in the past 12 months as a starter. With this screening procedure, a negative SUD screen is an opportunity for prevention, and a positive screen is an opportunity to intervene. What are missing with this scenario are valid assessments of the risk level and or severity of drug use with each class of drugs for each individual patient. It is essential to have that information to provide appropriate intervention options that are most effective for each patient.

This presentation will explore the challenges and opportunities on how screen drug use can enhance the development and implementation of collaborative chronic care model for SUD in primary care.